Coorparoo Skin Cancer Clinic

Call: (07) 3324 0466

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Skin biopsy

A method used to test a suspicious skin lesion, rash or mole. Local anaesthetic is injected under the lesion or area of concern. Lesions can be completely excised (cut out), shaved off the surface, or sampled with a punch biopsy instrument. The sample is now sent to the pathologist for testing.

Curettage (shave removal of low grade skin cancers).

Some low grade and surface skin cancers can be treated by this method. Multiple thin shaves taken from multiple angles allows the skin cancer to be removed with minimal tissue loss and resulting in virtually no post operative pain. A simple dressing is applied and should be removed in 24 hours.

Skin Cancer Surgery (all skin cancer types).

If a skin biopsy confirms a skin cancer, or the doctor feels that biopsy is unnecessary, depending on the type of cancer, its size and position our doctor will offer to remove it:- Using local anaesthetic to numb the area, we excise (cut out) the spot, along with a safety margin of normal tissue, to ensure we have completely excised the cancer. Underground or surface sutures, or a combination of both will be used to close the resulting wound. A dressing is then applied. Sutures may need to be removed 1 week later.

Melanoma surgery. (excluding lymph node surgery).

We have taken a biopsy or possibly your GP has excised the suspicious freckle. Melanoma has now been confirmed and requires much wider excision. The surgery required and the amount of tissue required to be removed will be explained to you. Providing hospital treatment is not required, wide local excision will be performed under local anaesthetic as a day surgery at the clinic. Underground or surface sutures, or a combination of both will be used to close the resulting wound. A dressing is then applied. Sutures may need to be removed 1 week later.

Skin flap repair surgery.

Used on the face for treating larger skin cancers that require more complex closures. The skin cancer is excised with a safe margin of skin. The resulting wound will usually be too large to close directly. A flap is prepared using skin adjacent to the wound and is rotated or advanced into position. Underground or surface sutures, or a combination of both will be used to close the resulting wound. A dressing is then applied. Sutures will need to be removed 1 week later.

Skin grafting.

Used when flaps can’t close a surgical wound. Skin is taken from another site, prepared and grafted onto the surgical wound. Surface sutures will be used to hold the graft in position. A more complicated dressing is then applied to the wound and graft site. Sutures will need to be removed 1 week later.

Margin Control Surgery. ( “Slow MOHS” or “Staged Excision”)

Used when the skin cancer to be excised is very difficult to see or the edges of the tumour may be very poorly defined. The wound will usually require a complex closure such as a flap to close the wound. It is important that the tumour margins are confirmed to be clear before the wound is repaired.
Day 1: the skin cancer is excised, the wound is left open, and is dressed to stop bleeding.
Day 2: the results are back, the skin cancer margins are usually reported clear, and now closure can proceed, usually via a flap procedure.
If margins are not clear, more skin is removed at the involved site. Closure is now put off for a further day pending confirmation of clear margins.
Day 3: the 2nd results are back, the skin cancer margins should now be reported clear, and closure can proceed.

Other Procedures.

  • Surgical excision of benign skin lesions (for diagnostic or other medical reasons). These include lipoma’s ( fatty lumps), skin cysts, scalp cysts, benign moles, skin tags, some “age spots” etc
  • Shave excision of some benign skin lumps. This procedure is not suitable for most benign skin lumps.
  • Diathermy ( electrosurgical destruction ) – suitable to remove some benign skin lesions.
  • Cryotherapy ( freeze destruction ) - suitable to remove some benign lesions.

Phone

(07) 3324 0466

Email

admin@skindoctor.com.au

Fax

(07) 3324 0499

Address

148 Chatsworth Road (cnr Trundle St)
Coorparoo Q 4151

Get Directions

Parking

Parking available behind the building or in Trundle St

Clinic Hours

Monday-Thursday: 8.30am - 6.00pm
Friday:  8.30am - 5.00pm
Saturday and Sunday: Closed